Days 28 – 30 in Tassie

11th December, 2017.

Our short stay in suburbia behind us, we headed for the hills – literally!! Our destination was the Wings Wildlife Park which offers low cost camping beside the Leven River and a chance to do some sightseeing in the area surrounding Gunns Plains.

What an idyllic spot and there were only two other campers when we arrived.

A family of Pacific Black Ducks.

This female Superb Fairy-Wren posed nicely on a stalk of grass near our campsite.

Lots of thistle growing wild.

As it was such a beautiful day and the weather can be so changeable here, we decided to drive to Leven Canyon to do the circuit walk. Along the way, we came across a short walk to a waterfall.

We crossed this small creek which seemed to go nowhere.

Disappearing over the edge.

To become this.

It was a very pretty drive to Leven Canyon. There is a small but very pretty camping area at the start of the walk but we were pleased we didn’t chance finding a spot to camp as all the suitable places were occupied.

The walk consists of three parts, two of which can be done as stand alone return walks. The first is to a spectacular lookout high above the canyon floor. Short but steep.

This is a panorama taken with my iPhone.

The second stage of the circuit involves descending 697 steps, known as the Forest Stairs. Fortunately, there is a very sturdy rope to hold onto.

At the bottom of the steps is a 200 metre walk to another lookout.

Another iPhone panorama taken from the lower lookout showing the flow of the Leven River through the canyon.

The final stage of the loop walk is through Fern Glade. Very beautiful with stunning tree ferns. Again it was a short but steep walk.

Back at camp we enjoyed a rest overlooking the river in the stunning afternoon light.

Mrs Fairy-wren was back on her grass stalk again.

12th December, 2017.

The next day the weather gods again were kind to us so we explored further to the west intending to make a loop out to Waratah to check out the camping area, through Hellyer Gorge on the Murchison Highway to Burnie and then back to camp via the road from Penguin.

But first Erich was out early to take advantage of the morning light and the mist over the river.

On our drive, not far from camp, we came to a spot overlooking the valley where we could pull off the steep road.

A final resting place.

At Hellyer Gorge there is a short but pretty walk to and along the river.

In Burnie we stopped at the Visitor Information Centre to check out the Makers Workshop which had been recommended to us. All kinds of Artisans display and sell their work there and depending on the day, it is sometimes possible to chat with the artists.

This is the view from the cafe at the Visitor Centre. The little white blobs between the boardwalk and the railway track on the far right are concrete penguin burrows similar to those we saw at Lillico Beach near Devonport. This is a popular penguin viewing spot.

Back at camp we spent a peaceful evening beside the river watching the water birds and hoping for a platypus sighting.

13th December, 2017.

Another glorious day and time to catch up with the washing.

Our peaceful idyll was somewhat disturbed by logging trucks constantly passing by as they transported the prepared logs from a nearby forest.

There were scores of Tasmanian Native Hens and chicks. They can be quite noisy but funny to watch as they scurry to and fro.

Finally we spotted a platypus. Not a good photo but evidence nonetheless.

The ever present European Goldfinch.

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